Local Stories

An Old Style Quenching of the Thirst

In earlier times, Ipswich, like most towns and cities across the country, had its share of local soft drink and cordial manufacturers.  One of our first manufacturers was W.G. Livermore.

Born in England on 23 November 1853, William George (W.G) journeyed with his parents George and Mary Ann to Australia on the Kate.  Arriving in Sydney on 18 November 1854, the family stayed in Sydney for six weeks before sailing to Moreton Bay.  In 1855, they travelled to Ipswich on the steamer, Hawke.  William’s father George was known for his cooperage business and involvement with the West Moreton Agricultural and Horticultural Society.

During his time as a local businessman, W.G. Livermore operated at different premises around Ipswich.  In November 1894, he commenced a business in Bremer Street with E. Whiffin called Aerated Waters and Cordial Manufacturers, but by July of the following year the relationship had soured with Mr Edward Whifffin being committed for trial on embezzlement charges.  Ultimately, he was found not guilty of the crime.  Later in the year, Mr Livermore’s business interests were referred to as W.G. Livermore and Co., Aerated Waters and Cordial Makers.

By August 1896, Mr Livermore had acquired the business in Brisbane Street formerly known as John Ferguson’s (cordial manufacturer).   A Queensland Times article dated 20 August noted that William had purchased a vertical “Otto” gas-engine which at the time was the only one of its kind in the country.  The “Otto” was used to drive the aerating machinery.    In this year, the company was known for its manufacture of aerated water, cordials, ginger beer, baking powder, horehound and hop beer as well as soda water crafted from Helidon mineral water.  They were also the sole local agent for Henry Hires’ Root Beer.

During 1897, W.G. Livermore removed his business from the Brisbane Street premises to East Street, next to Mr J. Johnston’s Brewery.  His intention was to continue the manufacture of aerated waters, cordials, vinegar, hop beer and horehound, under the supervision of Mr Ferguson.   That year the company was complimented for its manufacture of kola champagne, a particularly refreshing summer drink that was all the latest “rage”. Despite the name, the flavour of this drink was more likely to have resembled bubble gum or cream soda than either champagne or cola.

On 3 December 1903, two business announements in the Queensland Times highlighted the changes in the drinks industry in Ipswich.  Firstly, Mr Livermore informed his old customers that he had recommenced business as an aerated water manufacturer in the former premises of the West Moreton Brewery in Booval.  He stated that he had no connection with the East Street Factory.   Below this advertisement was one for the Ipswich Aerated Water Co. (proprietors Barnes & Pitman), notifying readers that they were firmly established in the late business of W.E. Thomas which had been carried out in Livermore’s Factory in East Street.  Interestingly, W.E Thomas was the step-son of W.G. Livermore.

 

Demijohn from W G Livermore soft drinks (early 1900s), Ipswich, 1990s - Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Demijohn from W G Livermore soft drinks (early 1900s), Ipswich, 1990s – Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Eagle-eyed readers may have spotted the significance of Mr Livermore’s registered trademark “LAVOOB”.  It is Booval spelt backwards.  Mr Livermore conducted his business in Booval for a number of years, before returning to the centre of town.  He continued with the manufacture of soft drinks and cordials up until the time of his death in March 1923.

Information taken from: ‘Death of Mr G. Livermore’, Queensland Times, Saturday 26 June 1909, p.11;  ‘Death of Mr Livermore’, Queensland Times, Friday 23 March 1923, p.4; ‘London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906”, Ancestry Database, retrieved 11 August 2017; New South Wales, Australia, Assisted Immigrants Passenger Lists, 1826-1896, Ancestry Database, retrieved 11 August 2017;  ‘Advertisement’, Queensland Times, Saturday 1 December 1894, p.1; ‘Ipswich Circuit Court – Criminal Sittings, Queensland Times, Saturday 3 August 1895, p. 3;  ‘A Handy Gas-Engine’, ‘Advertisement’, Queensland Times, Saturday 23 May 1896, p.1; Queensland Times, Thursday 20 August 1896, p,4; ‘Advertisement’, Queensland Times, Saturday 26 June 1897, p.1; ‘Business Announcements’, Queensland Times, Saturday 20 November 1897, p.2; ‘Business Announcements’, Queensland Times, Thursday 03 December 1903, p. 8.

 


Hotel Metropole

Recently the Hotel Metropole on the corner of Waghorn & Brisbane Streets closed its doors. Hotels have stood on this site for over 150 years. Whilst the Metropole first opened in 1906, it was built on the site of the old Harp of Erin Hotel. The hotel was also known as the Silver Fern in earlier years of the 21st century.

 

Hotel Metropole, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Hotel Metropole, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

The Metropole was designed by George Brockwell Gill with public and private bars, dining room, parlour, coffee room, billiard room, shop, kitchen, 1 bedroom and offices on the ground floor. Upstairs there were 13 bedrooms, drawing room, sitting room and 3 bathrooms. A cellar and wash-house were in the basement. The building cost over £3000 including brickwork by John Mackenzie, plumbing & gas-fitting by John Cuthbert and joinery by Arthur Foote, to name a few of the contractors. The structure was up-to-date with indoor lavatories, electric bells, hot water service and gas lights. And there were many decorative architectural details incorporated, including a stained glass window.

Mr C. Roberts, employed earlier by T.W.Boody, intended to use the shop on the ground floor as a hair-dressing salon and tobacconist.

Hotel  Metropole, front entrance, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Hotel Metropole, front entrance, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

In October 1906 when it opened, the hotel provided accommodation for “man and beast” (there were stables) and alcoholic beverages for thirsty travellers and locals. Miss Fairley was the licensee. Various members of her family were licensees of the Harp of Erin Hotel from 1893 until its closure.

Whilst the Metropole is an attractive and substantial brick building the Harp of Erin was a wooden structure that was removed or demolished in late 1905 or early 1906 to make way for the new hotel. It had become somewhat run-down by the 1890s but survived in some form until the early 20th century. Despite its perhaps lack of grandeur the Harp of Erin was clearly a landmark in the town as early as 1861 when Bee-Hive Stores used its name and location to advertise their own clothing & groceries business situated opposite in Brisbane Street. John Moran was the licensee from 1861-1862.

During the 19th century, victualler’s licenses had to be applied for and renewed annually. This involved advertising your intentions to apply, renew or transfer in the local paper and attending the Licensing Court.  An applicant had to have a good reputation in order to be successful in procuring a publican’s license for the sale of “fermented and spirituous liquors”.  The Justices in the court and local police could be formidable in their opposition to applications. Licenses were often transferred and the Harp of Erin had several licensees between 1861 and 1900, including Robert McGrory from 1872-1887 and Gaius Frederick Brown from 1890-1893. It appears that holding a liquor license at this time in Ipswich was not always a licence to print money. In 1876 there were 23 hotels in town or about 1 pub for every 108 adults.

The Metropole also experienced its fair share of burglaries and fires. In 1925, 1932 and 1940 the hotel was damaged by fire. The latter fire caused significant damage estimated at £2000 which was a considerable sum in 1940.  The earlier fires were chimney fires. Ironically, it seems that in December 1932 more damage was caused by water from the hose put up the chimney to douse the fire, than was caused by flames and smoke.

Panoramic view from railway line behind Brisbane Street, Ipswich, ca. 1987 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Panoramic view from railway line behind Brisbane Street, Ipswich, ca. 1987 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

 

Information taken from:

Picture Ipswich

http://picture.ipswich.qld.gov.au/awweb/main.jsp

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 29 September 1906, p.14.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 5 November 1861, p.2.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 22 April 1876, p.4.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 27 July 1865, p.1.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 4 October 1906, p.11.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 10 December 1895, p.3.

Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld), 20 March 1894, p.5.


Ipswich North State School 150th Anniversary

Ipswich North State School 1970. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Ipswich North State School 1970. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Ipswich North State School celebrated its 150th anniversary on Saturday 8 July 2017.

Ipswich North State School was formally opened on 1 July 1867. An account of the opening was originally reported by the Queensland Times on 2 July 1867. This same article states: “Only twenty-six children were entered on the roll, but now that the school is known to be opened, this number will no doubt soon be considerably increased.”

Classes for boys and girls were in the one building with a partition dividing them until 1874 when tenders were called to build a Boys’ School. The original building was then used for the Girls’ and Infants’ school. In the early 1930s both buildings needed major repairs so the decision was made to rebuild in brick and combine both the boys and girls into one large building. This building was opened on 4 May 1935, then in 1937 four extra classrooms and an undercover play area were added. This brick building is what we see today.

J. J. C. Bradfield. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

One of the speakers at the opening on Saturday 4 May 1935 was J. J. C. Bradfield who attended the Infants’ School then continued at the Boys’ School until he won a scholarship to Ipswich Grammar School. His name appears in a list which was published in the Brisbane Courier on Wednesday 2 February 1881.

Grammar School Scholarships. Brisbane Courier Wed 2 Feb 1881. Image taken from Trove Digitised Newspapers

Grammar School Scholarships. Brisbane Courier Wed 2 Feb 1881. Image taken from Trove Digitised Newspapers

Bradfield’s achievements include the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Story Bridge in Brisbane.

Information taken from:

Queensland Times, Tuesday 2 July, 1867, p.3 Local and General News

Brisbane Courier, Wednesday 2 February, 1881, p.3 Grammar School Scholarships

Personal correspondence


School holidays in Ipswich

School holidays are always cause for celebration when you are a child – no school and long days to fill with play and friends! Pure bliss!

When I was young in the early 1960s, school holidays in Ipswich were a treat. There was a visit to the Wintergarden Theatre or The Ritz (before it was demolished in 1966) to see the latest picture on offer.

Boys posing to advertise the film 'The Light in the forest' playing at the Ritz Theatre, Ipswich, December, 1961 -Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Boys posing to advertise the film ‘The Light in the forest’ playing at the Ritz Theatre, Ipswich, December, 1961 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Going to the pictures always involved a stopover at the lolly counter to pick up something sweet to chew during the movie, like Minties or Jersey milk toffee.  (In fact this was probably more important than the movie itself.)

Candy Bar of Wintergarden Theatre, Ipswich, 1979 -  Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Candy Bar of Wintergarden Theatre, Ipswich, 1979 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

On other days there would be a trip to Queens Park to play on the swings or slippery slide, and admire the kangaroos and koalas in the animal enclosure. These outings were highly anticipated and sometimes included a picnic lunch in the park.

Children on bullock wagon in Queens Park, Ipswich, 1966 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Children on bullock wagon in Queens Park, Ipswich, 1966 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

On shopping days, we would put on our “good” clothes and “go to town” enjoying the window displays, pretty clothes and toys for sale at Woolworths and Cribb & Foote. We never had any money to spend but since it was school holidays and treat-time we might have an ice cream soda at Penny’s in Brisbane Street.

Brisbane Street, from the corner of Ellenborough Street, Ipswich, 1960 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Brisbane Street, from the corner of Ellenborough Street, Ipswich, 1960 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Another outing was a day spent at Colleges Crossing or playing by the Bremer.

Colleges Crossing, Ipswich, 1961 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Colleges Crossing, Ipswich, 1961 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

In the 1960s it didn’t get better than this for kids enjoying a break from the routine of school.

Great memories of great times in Ipswich in the ‘60s.


Our People, Our Past

Portrait of Mr William Bretherton Parkinson, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Portrait of Mr William Bretherton Parkinson, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Born in England in 1886, Mr William Bretherton Parkinson came to Australia when he was 19 years of age. He worked for some time at the Ipswich Gas Company and Cribb and Foote’s. In 1919 he established himself as a Real Estate Agent and became very successful, partnering up with Mr Vic Noble in 1948. Messrs Parkinson and Noble were situated in Brisbane Street. He married Eileen Massey Robinson in 1915 and had two daughters. In 1942 his eldest daughter, Mavis Parkinson a missionary was killed during the invasion of New Guinea. Mr W B Parkinson passed away at the age of 65 years in 1951. (Information taken from The Queensland Times 17 May, 1951)

Portrait of the Hon. Jos. Francis, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Portrait of the Hon. Jos. Francis, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Sir Josiah Francis was born in Ipswich in 1890 and completed his schooling at St Edmunds College, Ipswich. In 1908 he began working as a clerk in the Queensland Department of Justice. He served as second lieutenant with the 15th Battalion in WWI and was wounded in 1918. Returning to Ipswich after the War, Francis involved himself in the Ipswich sub-branch and the Moreton district of the Returned Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Imperial League of Australia. He was elected into the House of Representatives in 1922 as a Nationalist candidate for Moreton and continued his political career concerning himself in matters relating to ex-servicemen. In 1927 he married Edna Clarke-Cribb. He became minister for the army from 1949 to 1955 and the navy from 1949-51 and 1954-55. In 1956 Francis was appointed Australian consul-general in New York and was knighted in 1957, retiring to Brisbane in 1961. He passed away in 1964 at Toowong. (Information taken from Australian Dictionary of Biography website 07.02.2017)

Portrait of Frederick James Meacham, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Portrait of Frederick James Meacham, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Born in England in 1892, Frederick James Meacham attended King Edward VI Grammar School. He and his family came to Australia in 1913 on the ship Omrah and settled in Maryborough. In 1916, aged 23 years, Frederick enlisted into the Australian Imperial Force. Returning from War Frederick moved to Auchenflower where he married Phoebe (Jean) Ada Elizabeth Cowton in April, 1921. They had two sons and two daughters. The family moved to Ipswich where Frederick was employed with The Queensland Times for over 20 years as a journalist, becoming Editor in 1923 and Manager for 13 years. Meacham was Director of the Queensland Country Press Pty Ltd, President of the Queensland Country Press Association, Chairman of Directors of the Ipswich Broadcasting Co. Pty Ltd, President of the Press Institute and Chairman of Directors of The Queensland Times. F J Meacham was also President of the Ipswich Rotary Club. He left The Queensland Times in 1941 to take up the position of Secretary of the Australian Provincial Daily Press Ltd in Victoria and by 1942 added Director to his role. In 1955 he was awarded an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire – Civil Division). Mr Meacham passed away in 1968 aged 77. The ‘F J Meacham Award’ “is presented annually to the regional daily newspaper judged to have attained the highest technical and editorial standard and having best served its community.”(Information taken from Ancestry Library Edition; Ancestry – Who’s Who in Australian 1921 -1950; The Queensland Times 4 May 1921; The Queensland Times, 13 Dec, 1941 ‘Mr F J Meacham Honoured’; The Argus 1 Jan 1955; The Canberra Times 15 Oct 1968; The Canberra Times 17 May 1985)


A June wedding

June weddings have been popular for centuries.  In the northern hemisphere June is summertime and winter snows have melted making it easier, especially in earlier times, to travel & hold celebrations. In the 19th and early 20th centuries when many British migrants settled in Australia, June was still a popular month for weddings perhaps because the heat of the Australian summer dissipated resulting in more comfortable conditions in which to celebrate and wear elegant wedding finery.

Nuptials celebrated in Ipswich in 1907 included that of James Cecil Richards and Clara Jane Markcrow. They were married on 15 June and went to live in Smith Street, North Ipswich. At this time, James was practising carpentry. As was the norm at that time, Clara performed “home duties”. Later they would move with their children to Liverpool and Wyndham Streets, before settling at James Street, East Ipswich for many years.

18414 James Cecil and Clara Jane Richards

James Cecil and Clara Jane Richards (nee Markcrow) wedding, Ipswich, 1907 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

On the 5th of June 1907 Sarah Amelia Walker of North Ipswich married Charles John Leigh at St Thomas’ Church in North Ipswich. This appears to have been a grand affair with lots of guests and many gifts. It was described as a “buttercup wedding” in the newspaper due to its particular decorative theme. Shades of yellow, white and cream were repeated in dresses, flowers and ribbons. Hand-painted buttercups and buttercup blooms featured in bouquets and other decorations.

At this time, many weddings in the Ipswich area were held on Wednesday and those featured in the Queensland Times would list gifts (and sometimes their value) received by the bride and groom and the giver’s name. Gifts to bridal attendants would also be reported. Silver cruets were popular wedding gifts, as were items like moustache cups and butter dishes. The menu at the reception or “wedding breakfast” was also newsworthy, as was the identity of the bride’s dressmaker and milliner. Brides and their bridesmaids at this time may have worn gowns sewn by Mrs J. Kinane of Bundamba, Miss Macartney of North Ipswich or Madame Connors of Cribb & Foote. Millinery could be found at T.C.Beirne’s. Mr F. Whitehouse was a well-known baker, confectioner & caterer of the town and owner of Whitehouse’s Café.  Sometimes the café in Nicholas Street would be used as a venue for a wedding reception. Sometimes the reception would be held at home in the dining room or in a marquee in the backyard. At other times a bush house would be specially constructed for the day or guests would adjourn to the Oddfellows Hall to enjoy the party. Sarah and Charles Leigh enjoyed their wedding celebrations in St Thomas’ Hall, North Ipswich where the bride was active in the church. Her parents lived at nearby Workshops Estate.

Following the ceremony it was quite common to be photographed in your wedding finery at Whiteheads studio.

After the wedding breakfast it was also common to depart for the honeymoon by horse & carriage, dragging old boots behind. For those newlyweds leaving by train it was customary to be accompanied to the railway station by guests showering rice & confetti. Sarah & Charles entrained for Sandgate with their well-wishers packing the Ipswich Railway Station platform to see them off on their honeymoon trip and journey to a new life.

With the newlyweds gone on holiday, it was time for remaining guests to play games and dance.

Following their marriage, Sarah and Charles went to live in Woodend Road. Later they would re-move to Glebe Road where they would run a mixed business or cash-and-carry store.

1012 Isabella Grace Brown 1907

Formal wedding portrait of Isabella Grace Brown and Arthur Ewald Mael Jaenke, Ipswich, 21 June 1911 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

 

Information taken from:

Ipswich & District Pioneer Register, Volume 1, Pre 1914, Ipswich Genealogical Society, ca.1994

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Saturday 8 June 1907, p.15.

Queensland Times, Saturday 15 June 1935, p.2.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Thursday 23 July 1908, page 11.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, Saturday 11 January 1908, page 9.


Were You a Fan?

[This post is best viewed using Chrome]

In the past, Ipswich businesses used advertising fans to promote their goods and services. Photos of some of the fans distributed by well-known local establishments are included below.  More examples of these advertising fans can be found on Picture Ipswich – the Ipswich Libraries’ online collection of historical images.

Series of images - Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Series of images – Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Many of you probably recognise the names of the businesses featured above. For those who are interested in finding out a little more about them, a brief overview follows.

Londy Bros. –

  • At the age of 15, Harry George Leondarakis (later anglicised to Londy) migrated to Australia.
  • After spending time in Toowoomba, Warwick and Rockhampton, he came to Ipswich in 1921.
  • Along with other family members, Harry owned two businesses in Brisbane Street – Café Australia and Café Paris. The latter ultimately became known as Londy’s Cafe.
  • In the 1930s, Harry Marendy purchased Café Australia and in 1958 the Coplin brothers bought Londy’s Café

You can find out more about some of the memorable cafés in Ipswich’s past here.

Cribb & Foote

  • Benjamin Cribb started his London Store business in Ipswich in 1849.
  • In 1854 Benjamin partnered with J.C. Foote, and Cribb & Foote was formed. The business grew to become an indelible part of Ipswich’s commercial history for 128 years.
  • The Cribb & Foote Families involvement with staff and the community ensured that they commemorated their 50th, 80th and 100th Anniversaries in grand style.

To learn more about this well-known Ipswich business take a look at Cribb & Foote celebrations.

Mr. George Shearer, High-class Pastrycook –

  • In July 1921, George Shearer acquired Mr August Langer’s pastry business in Goleby’s Buildings, Brisbane Street.
  • Towards the end of the following year, renovations were finished just in time for the busy festive season. Customers were able to purchase cakes of different sizes, along with shortbread, meat pies, sausage rolls, scones and tarts. Ice creams were also popular in the summer as was the soda fountain and its cool drinks.
  • To cope with business demands, Mr Shearer opened another premises next to Jackson & Meyers in Brisbane Street on 17 February 1923.
  • By January 1925, Mr Shearer was operating exclusively from his original Brisbane Street address.

Bertram’s Cake Shop (Bertram’s Cake Shop and Café) –

  • In October 1932, Jim Bertram took over George Shearer’s premises in Brisbane Street.  Wedding and birthday cakes were a specialty in the early days.
  • On 14 December 1933, Mr Bertram advertised the sale of a 450 pound Christmas Cake! There were 16 prize discs inside the cake and it could be purchased for 1 shilling/4 pence per pound. Over the years, the Christmas cakes got bigger and bigger. Butter short bread and scotch black buns were also sought after products.
  • As reported in the Queensland Times in 1939, at Bertram’s is was not just “cakes like mother used to make, but cakes that mother would have been proud to make.”

Information taken from –  Aphrodite and the Mixed Grill : Gender and Ethnic Relations in Ipswich’s Greek Cafés from 1900 to 2005 by Toni Risson; ; G. Shearer, Queensland Times, 30 July 1921, p.1; G. Shearer, Queensland Times, 2 Dec 1921, p. 7; G. Shearer, Queensland Times, 9 Dec 1922, p.10; Enterprise, Queensland Times, 16 Feb 1923, p.4; G. Shearer, Queensland Times, 31 Jan 1925, p.14; Bertram’s Cafe – J.M. Bertram, Queensland Times, 19 Sep 1939, p.9; Miscellaneous , Queensland Times, 28 Oct 1932, p.2; J. Bertram, Queensland Times, 14 Dec 1933, p.12.


Just in time for the Ipswich Show

Roll up, roll up!  Next week from the 19th to 21st May the Ipswich Show will be on again.

What an exciting time to be had with so much on offer for everyone including livestock, farm produce, young talent show, pet parades, dunny derby and even monster trucks.

Here is a blast from the past from the Ipswich Show.

Queensland Health Education Council display at the Ipswich Show, Ipswich, 1958 - Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Queensland Health Education Council display at the Ipswich Show, Ipswich, 1958 – Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

This is a Queensland Health Education Council display which they held at the Ipswich Show in 1958.  Just like today the Ipswich Show has been used by companies to do displays and demonstrations of their goods and wares.

Queensland Health Education Council was established circa 1945 to educate Queenslanders on issues of public health.    The aim of the Health Education Council was to encourage individuals to take responsibility for their health through campaigns that encouraged physical fitness, basic hygiene, immunisation and safety.  It was also concerned with the care of teeth, maternal and child welfare, and health education in schools, churches and at public meetings.

The Ipswich Show was established by the Queensland Pastoral Society 144 years ago in 1873 when it was held on 2nd of April 1873 at a site located at Churchill.

Other past show exhibitors have included Cribb and Foote, Modern Motors Pty Ltd, Bank of New South Wales, Bearing Service Co., Beirne Pty Ltd, Boonah Junior Farmers and many more.

Boonah Junior Farmer’s Display, Ipswich Show, Ipswich, 1959 - Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Boonah Junior Farmer’s Display, Ipswich Show, Ipswich, 1959 – Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

The Ipswich Show has always been popular with families and here we have some photos from the 1950’s .

Family at Ipswich Show, Ipswich, ca 1950 - Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Family at Ipswich Show, Ipswich, ca 1950 – Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

 

Children from the Trevis family riding the merry-go-round - Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Children from the Trevis family riding the merry-go-round – Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Information taken from :

Health Education Queensland Council Activities Explained, Cairns Post, 20 October 1945, Page 5

Ipswich City Council Time Line, Ipswich City Council

Ipswich Show Society Facts, Ipswich Show Society


The sport of cycling in Ipswich

When True Blue Lodge No.8 held a sports day at Sandy Gallop on 9 November 1885 it was to celebrate the Prince of Wales’ birthday. 3 bicycle races were part of the program. These were contested over 1 mile, 1.5 mile, and 2 miles. Ipswich’s close association with cycling was already well under way.

At this time, more people were riding horses than riding bicycles. Bikes were very rudimentary and there were no dedicated cycling tracks – even the roads were dirt and often little more than goat tracks. Still, their popularity grew and the sport of cycling with it.

The Ipswich Bicycle Club was formed in the 1880s. The Ipswich Cycling Club was formed in August 1892 and appears to have taken over from the by then defunct Ipswich Bicycle Club. Road races were immediately planned.  At this early stage a few cyclists started riding between Brisbane and Ipswich – a distance of 26 miles and 200 yards from Post Office to Post Office.

In the first decade of the 20th century there were at least 3 businesses in Ipswich that were selling bicycles, parts and accessories, or repairing them. These were: George Jackes in East Street; Joe McCarthy – Bicycle Builder; and, W. Dowd agent for Canada Cycle & Motor Agency.

Short & longer road races were a regular local occurrence. For instance, in March 1905 some 50 cyclists participated in a run to Rosewood starting from Cribb & Foote’s. In August 1910 West Moreton Cycling Club held a 2 mile road race on Brisbane–Ipswich Road commencing from St Helens Hill and finishing in Booval at Wood’s Hotel. Around this time Ipswich Amateur Wheelers had weekly road races. Ipswich residents must have become accustomed to viewing the peloton cycling around the local area on Saturdays and public holidays. In mid April 1912, 21 cyclists entered a 10 mile handicap race from Redbank to the water trough on Warwick Road with E. Parcell winning. Only the month before a five mile race from Girls Grammar School via Silkstone and ending at the same destination had been run with 22 competitors.

553

Competitors at the Ipswich Amateur Wheelers competition, 1928  (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Cycling remained a constant feature of the Ipswich scene for decades to come. When World War II erupted the sport went into recess like many other recreations and leisure pursuits. However the 1930s witnessed a vibrant racing scene in Ipswich with road & track racing, match races & scratch races being common.  In 1930 a match race between a roller skater and a cyclist was proposed. There was even an all-day race in 1932. During this decade a new cinders and coal track was constructed at Woodend Park (on the site of the current rugby union ground) for the Ipswich Amateur Wheelers. There was also another course at Newtown-Bundamba.

This was the era of the great Australian champion and 1936 Olympian Hubert Opperman. Women cyclists were also competing in the 1930s. Thelma Duce and Peggy Manson were prominent female riders and in 1925 Mrs Edna Mattingly won Queensland Lady Champion representing Rosewood.

In Ipswich at this time cycling could be enjoyed year-round as the road racing season would go from  May to October and the track season would kick-off around November.

Bert Loetzsch  was the proprietor of  a cycle shop in Brisbane Street, opposite Big White’s during this era and later his brother Vic Loetzsch  had the Silver King Cyclery.

The 1940s saw the rise of local cyclist Hilary Pocock who won 40 Ipswich and Queensland championships on road and track in the 15 years from 1944. Schulte’s Brothers Cycle Shop in Bell Street opened its doors in 1940 and for a period of time Hilary worked there.  During this decade there were some long and challenging road races including a 1949 road race from Ipswich to Warwick and return, totalling 250 miles (402.3 kms).

From the 19th century in Ipswich, holidays were used to hold sporting events. Athletic events & sports were seen as part of the fun and holiday celebrations. On Labour Day 1948 a sports carnival with track racing was held at the Ipswich Showgrounds. That year Hilary Pocock won the 2 Mile Labour Day Championship.

1055

Hilary Pocock with his brother, Warren, at the Woodend, Ipswich, cycling track, 1945 (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

In 1940, some members of Ipswich Amateur Wheelers left that club and formed Crescent Amateur Cycle Club, building a pear-shaped dirt track at Bundamba (opposite the school where the pool now is) for their home ground. This track was eventually sealed with bitumen but closed in 1968.

1013

Cyclists at the Bundamba bike track, Ipswich, ca. 1940s (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Just like bicycle wheels, local clubs and members seemed to rotate through club & ground changes. In the 1960s the Crescents and Ipswich Amateur Wheelers amalgamated and a few years after another  amalgamation occurred with the West Moreton Cycling Club that by decades’s end had changed its name to Ipswich City Amateur Wheelers . At this point in time the heyday of cycling in Ipswich may have passed although the city was still producing champions. For instance: Russell Clark represented Australia at the Commonwealth Games in Perth in 1962.

961

Crescent Cycling Club, Ipswich, 1940s (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Following all the club changes, closure of the Bundamba track & disrepair of the Woodend Park track, a velodrome was constructed at Limestone Park featuring 2 straights with banking at each end. This was an outdoor facility open to all kinds of weather that started to decline by the end of the seventies, was repaired in 2000, and ultimately demolished in 2010, but not before the facility had hosted national, state & world championship races.

 

4948

Bike velodrome at Limestone Park, Ipswich, 1971 (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

 

Information taken from :

Ipswich Advertiser, 19 October 1988, p.18.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 17 October 1885, p.4.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 17 November 1887, p.5.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 9 August 1892, p.5.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 18 August 1892, p.4

Queensland Times, 27 August 1909, p.1.

Queensland Times, 29 August 1910, p.2.

Queensland Times, 27 November 2003, p.17.

Queensland Times, 25 March 1912, p.6.

Queensland Times, 15 April 1912, p.2.

Queensland Times, 19 November 1931, p.9.

Queensland Times, 5 September 1932, p.5.

Queensland Times, 4 December 2010, https://www.qt.com.au/news/velodrome-dem…

Queensland Times, 19 June 1930.


The King George V. Memorial Scout Hall

The King George V. Memorial Scout Hall on Milford Street was officially opened on Saturday 7 August 1937. It was to be the new home for the 2nd Ipswich Scout Group.

The advertisement for the Scout Den opening that appear in The Queensland Times, 7 August 1937.

The advertisement for the Scout Hall official opening. Appeared in The Queensland Times, 7 August 1937.

The 2nd Ipswich Scout Group had its origins in 1923, when it was launched by Mr Val Outridge, a former member of the 1st Ipswich Scout Group. The group utilised the Central Congregational Church’s Young People’s Hall in East Street for their meetings. It was said that the hall was used more by the Scouts and Guides than for any other purpose! This arrangement lasted until June 1936, when the Hall was sold and the Scouts had to vacate. The last Scout meeting there was Friday 21 June, 1936.

Needing a new home, the Scouts were able to stow their equipment in the garage of Mr & Mrs Wratten. Mr H.S. Cribb allowed part of the old power-house building, owned by Cribb and Foote, to be used for meetings. In the meantime they worked towards building a new Scout Hall.

By July 1936 permission had been obtained from the council for the lease of some land in Queens Park, fronting onto Milford Street. Fundraising for the hall began in earnest, with the Scouts pursuing many money-raising ventures – including hosting dances, and performing concerts and shows. Assistance and support also came from Mayor Stephenson, the Aldermen, the Ladies’ Committee, and the Rotary Club.

Construction on the hall began towards the end of March 1937, the work being carried out by builder Mr J. Donald. It was to measure 25ft x 40ft and feature a brick fireplace on the rear wall. An additional leader’s room of 10ft x 14ft was to be attached to one end. The hall itself was purchased from elsewhere, dismantled and then brought to its new location for re-erection. By the end of April the hall’s framework was up, and in May the hall was mostly completed. It was painted dark red and green and featured a highly polished wooden floor. From the beginnings of the project the intention had been to name the new hall the King George V. Memorial Scout Hall, in memory of the late King and patron of the Scouting Association. A carved wooden sign with this name was placed above the front door. This sign is still in place today.

King George V. Memorial Scout Hall, August 1937. Photo appeared in The Queensland Times, 9 August 1937.

King George V. Memorial Scout Hall, August 1937. Photo appeared in The Queensland Times, 9 August 1937.

From 21 May 1937, the Scouts and Cubs could select their patrol corners and begin using the hall for their meetings. They quickly decorated the interior with Scouting trophies, flags, displays, and equipment. A painting by Scoutmaster R. Donald stood above the fireplace, showing a uniformed Scout hiking along a bush track. Scoutmaster Donald’s work also appeared on the Hall windows, each decorated with Scout badges done in painted imitation leadlight.

On Saturday 7 August 1937, the hall was officially opened by Mr Jos. Francis, M.H.R. Upon arrival, Mr & Mrs Francis were welcomed with a guard of honour. Mr Francis then presented a speech on the important role Scouting played within the community, followed by cutting the cord across the hall doorway. He then knocked on the door and as it was opened declared the hall also officially opened. Mr D. Roberts, a former Scout, presented the group with a painted silver Scout badge carved from pine. This was later mounted on the front of the hall.

The King George V. Memorial Scout Hall in 1991. Photo courtesy of Picture Ipswich, taken as part of the Ipswich Heritage Study.

The King George V. Memorial Scout Hall in 1991. Photo courtesy of Picture Ipswich, taken as part of the Ipswich Heritage Study.

The 2nd Ipswich Scouts are today known as the Queens Park Scout Group. They still meet regularly in the King George V. Memorial Scout Hall. The hall has had some additions over the years, including two rear rooms, a toilet block and a storage area. The leaders’ room is now a kitchen, and a porch with wheelchair access has been added to the front.

The King George V. Memorial Scout Hall as it appears in May 2017.

The King George V. Memorial Scout Hall as it appears in May 2017. Photo courtesy Ipswich Libraries.

Sources:

  • Ipswich Heritage Study Vol.3
  • Picture Ipswich, Ipswich Libraries
  • 2nd Ipswich Group, The Queensland Times, Friday 12 March 1937, p9
  • New Scout Hall, The Queensland Times, Thursday 20 May 1937, p6
  • Scout Notes, The Queensland Times, Friday 6 August 1937, p4
  • New Hall Opened, The Queensland Times, Monday 9 August 1937, p8
  • Scout Notes, The Queensland Times, Friday 13 August 1937, p4