Local Stories

Save the Date!

Before the era of mass-produced celebrity and themed-calendars, many businesses produced promotional calendars for their customers.  On Picture Ipswich we are fortunate enough to have digitised copies of calendars from several local businesses, including W.V. Hefferan (The Australian Shopkeeper) and T.D. Johnson (General Shopkeeper).

Though not locally born, Mr William Vincent (W.V) Hefferan ran a grocery store in Ipswich for 17 years and also served as an Alderman in both Ipswich and Brisbane.   Born in Tiaro on 25 November 1873 to Kearan and Mary (nee Mullins), Mr Hefferan had a varied employment history before making his way to our part of the state.  He started his working life as an apprentice at Walkers Ltd, Maryborough, later moving to Rockhampton to work for Mr William Kidston, the owner of a book store and one-time Premier of Queensland.  In 1897, Mr Hefferan joined the Royal Australian Artillery and served at Thursday Island for two years. Following this service, he moved south and gained employment as a machinist at the Ipswich Railway Workshops, where he remained for 13 years.

Calendar used by W. V. Hefferan, The Australian Storekeeper, Ipswich, 1929 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Calendar used by W. V. Hefferan, The Australian Storekeeper, Ipswich, 1929 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Mr Hefferan left the Workshops when he stood for the seat of Bremer against Mr J.C. Cribb.  The election race was close, though he ultimately lost.   While unsuccessful in his electoral runs for the seats of Fassifern, Stanley and Moreton, Mr Hefferan eventually served as an Ipswich Alderman (1917-1921; 1924-1927 and 1930-1933) and was the Chairman of the Council’s Finance Committee.

Thought to be a portrait of William Vincent Hefferan, Ipswich, 1930s - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Thought to be a portrait of William Vincent Hefferan, Ipswich, 1930s – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Upon their departure to Brisbane in 1933, the Hefferans were praised for their contributions to the Ipswich community.  Besides his political efforts, Mr Hefferan was Patron of the West Moreton Cycling Association and Vice President of the Model Band.  Meanwhile, his wife – Mary Josephine Hefferan (nee Sherman) – was involved in many local causes including her work as Treasurer of the St Mary’s Benevolent Society.

In 1934, Mr Hefferan became the Alderman for South Brisbane and remained in that position until his death.  He died on 17 November 1937 at his home in Highgate Hill following a four month illness. He was survived by his wife, a son, two daughters as well as two brothers.

Mr Hefferan had a long association with the A.L.P. and was an active member of the Australian Natives Association (A.N.A).   With his interest in music, he was the organiser for the A.N.A. Eisteddfod for several years, Chairman of the South Brisbane Library Committee, and was involved with a number of other committees and associations.

In 1929, the Hefferans sold their grocery store to Mr and Mrs De Lacy Johnson.  Mr Johnson was formerly a miner who remained in the grocery trade for over 20 years.

Calendar used by T. D. Johnson, general storekeeper, Ipswich, 1933 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Calendar used by T. D. Johnson, general storekeeper, Ipswich, 1933 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

On 19 December 1947, a celebration was held  in Mr Johnson’s honour with the Ipswich Mayor (J.C. Minnis) and other dignitaries in attendance.  Having received the congratulations of those present, he made mention of the hard work and long hours that were necessary for success.   In June of the following year, Mr Johnson and his family were once again honoured for their business endeavours.  With around 40 guests in attendance, Mr Johnson spoke on behalf of his family and accepted the tributes paid to them by those present.

In a noteworthy, yet unfortunate turn of events, a formal apology was published in the Queensland Times regarding an article that appeared in the “Queensland Shopkeepers Journal” on 12 January 1949.  The publishers and printers of that journal apologised for the tone of their article, entitled “From Miner to Successful Storekeeper”.  They stated that they had now discovered that there was no foundation for the implications made about how the store was conducted by Mr Hefferan before it was purchased by the Johnsons in 1929.

Information taken from :

‘Ald. W.V. Hefferan Passes. Lifelong Association with A.L.P. Former Ipswich Identity’, Queensland Times, Thursday 18 November, 1937, p. 6

‘Early Departure. Mr and Mrs W.V. Hefferan. Loss of Excellent Citizens.’, Queensland Times, Friday 23 June 1933, p.6.

’20th year in the Grocery Trade’, Queensland Times, Saturday 20 December 1947, p.2

‘Mr T.D. Johnson Honoured’, Queensland Times, Monday 21 June 1948, p.2

‘Apology’, Queensland Times, Wednesday 9 March 1949, p.6


100 years ago this week …

A century ago the third Battle of Ypres was in full swing, with Australian soldiers in action at Polygon Wood, Broodseinde Ridge and Passchendaele.

Private Waterman Alexander Brown of Ipswich, and Private Norman Blank of Esk – members of the 25th Battalion A.I.F. were wounded on Thursday 4 October 1917 during the Battle of Broodseinde. 239 men and 12 officers of the 25th Battalion became casualties during the Broodseinde action. The fighting began before dawn with soldiers encountering fierce resistance as they advanced over boggy ground, using their bayonets and firing from the hip. The battle was a victory for Allied forces although the loss of life was staggering. 6423 Australians died that day. Brown and Blank both died of wounds 2 days later on 6th October 1917.

Private Waterman Alexander Brown

Private Waterman Alexander Brown

It was the practice at this time for military authorities to telegram the grim news to the local mayor who would then deliver the message to the next of kin. On Saturday 20 October Mayor Cameron dutifully visited the Brown residence on Warwick Road, Ipswich to inform Mrs Margaret Brown (widow) of her son’s death.

On the day that Waterman died, thousands of miles away in Europe, on Saturday 6th October 1917  it was ironic  that the Queensland Times printed a poem by “Table Talk” that included the lines:  ‘the name of the soldier’s mother, Is last on the soldiers lips’. The same could be said for Waterman’s mother who never stopped mourning her son and remembering him. Each year until she died she inserted an In Memoriam notice in the Queensland Times to commemorate his death.

His father Gaius Frederick Brown had been proprietor of the Harp of Erin pub in Brisbane Street from 1890-1893. Since Waterman (or Watty as he was known) was born in 1891 he would have lived in the old pub for a time and was quite probably born there. His younger brother George was also a World War I soldier.

By October 1917 the tide of war in Europe was beginning to turn but there were many more casualties, some from Ipswich.  Private Arthur Simmons of North Ipswich died on the battlefield on 4 October 1917. Christopher Everding of the Bundamba area, also of the 25th Battalion, was killed in action in Belgium on 31 October 1917.

Christopher Everding, headstone at Hooge Crater Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium, 2015 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Christopher Everding, headstone at Hooge Crater Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium, 2015 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Arthur Robert Elliott of One Mile Estate died of wounds in Etaples, France a few days earlier on 22 October.

Dead Man’s Penny issued for Arthur Robert Elliott of One Mile Estate, Ipswich, 1922 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Dead Man’s Penny issued for Arthur Robert Elliott of One Mile Estate, Ipswich, 1922 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Arthur George Bennett of Lyon Street, Ipswich was wounded on 21 October. Fortunately he recovered and returned to Australia in 1918. David Victor Finimore of Arthur Street received a shot wound to his left leg on the 12th but lived to fight on until 1918 only to die of wounds in France.

Arthur George Bennett, Ypres, Belgium, 1917 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Arthur George Bennett, Ypres, Belgium, 1917 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

 

Information taken from:

Australian War Memorial. https://www.awm.gov.au/

National Archives of Australia. http://naa.gov.au/

Picture Ipswich. http://picture.ipswich.qld.gov.au

Queensland Times, Saturday 6 October 1917, p.5.

Queensland Times, Monday 22 October 1917, p.6.


American Servicemen in Ipswich

On 3 September, 1939 Australia’s Prime Minister, Robert Gordon Menzies, stoically announced Australia’s entry into the Second World War with a nationwide radio announcement.  After the bombing of Pearl Harbour in December 1941, the Americans declared war on Japan.  When Singapore fell to the Japanese in early 1942, Australia was faced with the hard reality of fighting a seemingly unstoppable force without the assistance of Britain, already over-committed to fighting in Europe and North Africa.  Thus, Australia became the staging post for joint military action with American and Australian troops fighting Japanese military aggression in the Pacific.  The headquarters of General Douglas MacArthur, US commander of the deadly Southwest Pacific theatre, were based in Brisbane.

Official visit of American senators to the Amberley Air Force base, September 1942.  Image courtesy of State Library Queensland.

Official visit of American senators to the Amberley Air Force base, September 1942. Image courtesy of State Library Queensland.

Australians watched with amazement and excitement as American military personnel began arriving in Australia’s capital cities and regional centres in their thousands.  When the American presence finally came to an end in 1947, approximately 2, 291, 000 American military personnel had spent some of their war years in Brisbane.  They left an enduring cultural on Brisbane and its surrounds, including Ipswich, for at the start of the War, the population of Brisbane and its surrounds was just 340,000! Australians and Americans enjoyed much in common as the local reception given to the International Army Championship Rodeo held in Ipswich in 1944 attests with 4,000 spectators. According to the Queensland Times (6 March, 1944), the event was cancelled due to a rampaging bull but well-dressed American nurses sold programmes to raise money for local and regional charitable causes.

The White Australia Policy, or essentially legislative restrictions placed on the entry of non-white peoples into Australia, was overridden during the War to enable the entry of African-American military personnel who were deployed throughout Queensland in primarily non-combatant roles.  Sadly, in Ipswich, as it was in Brisbane, black and white American military personnel were segregated.  For example, African-American soldiers were not permitted to enter Ipswich and were confined to camps nearby, including Wacol and Redbank.  Despite this many Ipswich people welcomed the African-Americans into their community.

American Airman, Otis Flowers, lived in Freeport, New York and spent time in Ipswich during World War 2. Photograph taken in front of St. Pauls Anglican Church approx. 1942.  Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich.

American Airman, Otis Flowers, lived in Freeport, New York and spent time in Ipswich during World War 2. Photograph taken in front of St. Pauls Anglican Church approx. 1942. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich.

At the start of the conflict, Australia’s defensive capabilities were in a parlous state.  Much of Australia’s military resources were deployed in support of the British war effort; what was left for defence included just 32,000 soldiers, two air squadrons and 185 tanks.  As such the War required the establishment or enhancement of various military centres throughout the country.  Amberley airfield, south of Ipswich, had been constructed prior to the war.  However, it assumed major logistical importance because of its sealed runways, a necessity now that conflict in the Pacific required heavier combat aircraft.  Additionally, with Brisbane also becoming the headquarters of the USAAF Fifth Air Force, the United States Army Air Corps established an Air Eschalon at Amberley.  Operations at Amberley airfield included aircraft maintenance and salvage and American and Australian personnel assembled from kit form combat aircraft, the Bell P-39 Airacobras, Curtiss Kittyhawks and the Douglas Dauntless.

Kittyhawk fighter aircraft, at Amberley airfield, Ipswich, 1941.  Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich.

Kittyhawk fighter aircraft, at Amberley airfield, Ipswich, 1941. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich.

In Ipswich, a dedicated cemetery was established for the Americans who died here or fighting in the near Pacific and quite close to the main cemetery.  In 1947, the graves of 1397 service personnel were exhumed and the bodies repatriated back to America.  The cemetery was renamed Manson Park after Ipswich resident, Mrs Rose Manson, who tended the graves and corresponded with the families of the dead.  Ipswich will not forget the contribution of Australia’s wartime friends.

American Military Cemetery Gates, Manson Park, Ipswich, 1946.  Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich.

American Military Cemetery Gates, Manson Park, Ipswich, 1946. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich.

 

Information taken from

Buchanan, R. (1995). Ipswich Remembers – Military Heritage of Ipswich from the 1860s to the 1990s. Ipswich City Council and The Australia Remembers Committee.

Buchanan, R. (2016). Then and Now – A Pictorial History of Ipswich, Ipswich, APN Australian Publishing.

Evans, R. (2007). A History of Queensland. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.

Hatchman, G. (2013). The History of RAAF Base Amberley [Fact Sheet]. Retrieved from
 http://www.ipswich.qld.gov.au/__data/ass…

Marks, R. & J. (2015). Brisbane WW2 V Now: from an American Archives’ photo viewpoint. Amberley Airfield. 22. Queensland: R.R. and A.J. Marks.

Queensland Government, Queensland WWII Historic Places (Royal Australian Airforce).  Retrieved from http://www.ww2places.qld.gov.au/theservi…

Office of Economic and Statistical Research. (2009). Queensland Past and Present: 100 Years of Statistics, 1896–1996. Retrieved from http://www.qgso.qld.gov.au/products/reports/qld-past-present/qld-past-present-1896-1996-ch03-sec-01.pdf

Bullock Scatters Rodeo Crowd’, Queensland Times, 6 March 1944, p. 2.

‘Deeply Impressive Ceremony at Ipswich American Cemetery’, Queensland Times, 31 May 1945, p. 2.

Work at US Cemetery Should Finish Today’, Queensland Times, 20 December 1947, p. 2.


Abattoirs and butcher shops of Ipswich – almost a thing of the past

Churchill Abattoir also known as Ipswich abattoir is closing at the end of September 2017. It is currently the largest domestic abattoir in Australia.

The closure may prove to be temporary however it is a significant moment for its 500 employees, and an historic one for Ipswich. The modern facility opened in February 1959 with about 40 employees.

At least as early as 1913 stock was being slaughtered in Churchill for J. V. Francis & Co. Butchers who advertised that their stock was being slaughtered under the supervision of a Government Veterinary Inspector. At this time, Francis & Co. had 5 butcher shops in Ipswich located at Brisbane Street – East, Down Street, Burnett Street in West Ipswich, East Street, and Churchill Abattoirs.

Churchill Abattoir slaughter house, Churchill, Ipswich, 1910s - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Churchill Abattoir slaughter house, Churchill, Ipswich, 1910s – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

In 1861 there were at least 3 butchers in Ipswich – all located in the area that we consider the CBD now but which would have accounted for most of Ipswich back then. There was O. Connor in Brisbane Street, Michael Ford on the corner of East & South Streets, and B. Wright in Nicholas Street. In 1934 when a butcher shop described as the Nicholas Street Mart was to be auctioned, it claimed to be “the oldest established butcher shop in Ipswich”. Watson Brothers Butchers was an early establishment also, opening in 1879. They owned 3 shops in Nicholas and Brisbane Streets by 1895.

R. McLeod, Carcass & Family Butcher were proprietors of 2 establishments in 1895 in North Ipswich – in Downs Street and The Terrace. This business ran meat carts twice a week to homes in Pine Mountain, and daily to Mount Crosby, Booval, and Blackstone.

R. McLeod's, butcher, North Ipswich, 1895 (1990s) - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

R. McLeod’s, butcher, North Ipswich, 1895 (1990s) – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

For much of the 20th century butcher shops were commonplace in Ipswich neighbourhoods. Long-term and older residents of Ipswich may remember these businesses:

  • Rossiter’s butcher shop at 10 Pine Mountain Road, North Ipswich.
Rossiters butcher shop at 10 Pine Mountain Road, North Ipswich, 1960s - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Rossiters butcher shop at 10 Pine Mountain Road, North Ipswich, 1960s – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

  • Coward & Co. Butchers at 86 Downs Street, on the corner of Ferguson Street, North Ipswich
  • Paramount Butcher Shop located in Brisbane Street near the old QT building
  • Auld’s butchery at 9 Nicholas Street
  • Doug Foote the butcher at Glebe Road, Booval
  • C.W. & D.M. Rowlings’ butcher shop in Woodend Road, Woodend
  • Johnston’s butcher shop at the Fiveways, opposite Ipswich Girls Grammar School
  • Thompson’s Cash Butchery, opposite the State Butchery in Brisbane Street
  • J. Rossiter Cash Butcher, One Mile

 

Rossiters butcher shop at One Mile, Ipswich, 1930s - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Rossiters butcher shop at One Mile, Ipswich, 1930s – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

A number of small slaughter houses were located in the Churchill area throughout the first half of the 20th century. By the late 1930s however some dissatisfaction in the Ipswich community had arisen regarding these businesses. It was not until 1949 that the local community and council got serious about a new abattoir to replace them. Even then the process of site selection, land resumption, tenders and construction took another ten years. It was intended that this new facility, positioned on 127 acres & 3 roods, handle the slaughtering of all meat for local consumption.

 

Information taken from:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-29/up-to-900-workers-lose-jobs-abattoir-chicken-factory-ipswich/8851042

https://www.qt.com.au/news/close-900-ipswich-workers-will-lose-their-jobs/3217570/

Ipswich Herald & General Advertiser, 29 March 1861, p.4.

Queensland Times, 14 March 1951, p.2.

Queensland Times, 15 March 1951, p.2.

Queensland Times, 17 May 1952, p.10.

Queensland Times, 16 April 1934, p.10.

Queensland Times, 7 August 1929, p.13.

Queensland Times, 25 October 1913, p.7.


Ipswich School of Arts

Soon after settlers arrived and 10 years before Ipswich became a municipality in 1860, a School of Arts was proposed in town thus proving that the people of Ipswich have always valued books & reading. This institution has evolved through a number of name changes and locations but has remained a meeting place for Ipswichians. Ipswich Libraries descends from these humble roots.

It all started with the Ipswich Subscription & Literary Institute in 1850. Benjamin Cribb was the president of the group. Their base was initially at the corner of Brisbane Street and Wharf Streets, but would move to a small room in a wooden cottage further up Brisbane Street (where London Pharmacy would later stand) that was Mr Beattie’s bookselling and stationery business. This site would also become S.F. Whitehead’s stationer’s shop in later years.

In 1858 the Ipswich Subscription & Literary Institute became the Ipswich Mechanics’ School of Arts and was subsequently housed in the disused wooden court house, situated on the former Police Court Reserve. Using a government grant and loan a fine new building was constructed and opened in 1865. This was what we know as the old town hall, now occupied by the Ipswich Art Gallery. The School of Arts remained here for the next 70 years or so and was a well-known establishment and cultural venue. Probably because it was a landmark, Mr John McDonald applied for a publican’s licence in 1876 to open a new hotel in Brisbane Street to be called the School of Arts Hotel.

 School of Arts, Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1864 (copy 1959)

School of Arts, Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1864 (copy 1959) – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

From the outset the institution included a small collection of books, a reading room, and literary or educational lectures.  The Ipswich Horticultural Society held its first exhibition in the School of Arts in December 1868. George Bashford, a political candidate for the Legislative Assembly attracted 600 people to a meeting held there on Tuesday 7 August 1883. The School of Arts was also the scene of musical entertainments, eisteddfods, poetry readings, and dramatic performances. In 1874 Zelindra Company performed horizontal bar work and trapeze act and the Ipswich Amateur Opera Company performed the Pirates of Penzance in 1897.  At one stage in 1904, several entertainments were to be held to pay for a new catalogue for the School of Arts including “an illustrated lecture” on the war in the Far East by Reverend C.E. James of Brisbane. The local chess team played matches there for decades.  Ipswich Parliamentary Class met for over 30 years in the School of Arts while the Elocution Class was a regular occurrence on the premises in the early years.

 

 Program from Ipswich Elocution Class Entertainment, Ipswich, Tuesday 26 March, 1867

Program from Ipswich Elocution Class Entertainment, Ipswich, Tuesday 26 March, 1867 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Despite its conservatism the Ipswich School of Arts was the scene of a riot on the evening of Thursday 5th November 1874. This unlikely and violent event was widely reported in provincial and city newspapers across Australia in the days that followed, including the South Australian Advertiser & Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW). Reverend D. Porteous was scheduled to deliver the last in a series of lectures on “The monk that shook the world”. It seems that this subject must have been somewhat contentious as the chairman James Foote appealed for order and the reverend claimed the right of free speech even before the lecture commenced.  A large audience was in attendance. Stones were thrown and chairs were broken. Two men were doused with kerosene when the chandelier was broken and a fire broke out.  Men fought inside and Mr R. Gill the postmaster was struck with a whip outside. There were several head injuries and Denis Toohey was stabbed. A very exciting night in the old town although it is still not clear why a riot occurred or why the lecture by Reverend Porteous was considered objectionable.

The School of Arts was managed by a committee of usually prominent townsfolk like businessmen and councillors. Membership was by subscription. Monthly meetings were held to monitor progress and expenditure. New books, mostly classics and “standards” with some “light reading” dribbled onto the shelves at a very sedate pace however by 1908 the collection numbered between 8000 and 9000 items.

In 1921 the School of Arts moved to the top floor of the Soldiers Memorial Hall in Nicholas Street where it would stay for about the next 30 years until moving yet again to the old Bank of Australasia building on the corner of Brisbane & Nicholas Streets. By then the School of Arts was named Ipswich Municipal Library and its management transferred to Ipswich City Council.

Ipswich Art Gallery and old Bank of Australasia building, Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1970

Ipswich Art Gallery and old Bank of Australasia building, Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1970 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

 

Information taken from:

Queensland Times, 26 February 1919, p.2.

Queensland Times, 29 January 1949, p.4.

Queensland Times, 24 November 1950, p.2.

Queensland Times, 22 July 1920, p.2.

Queensland Times, 25 June 1947, p.2.

Queensland Times, 15 February 1951, p.2.

Queensland Times, 6 March 1933, p.3.

Queensland Times, 7 April 1908, p.4.

Queensland Times, 6 November 1952, p.2.

Queensland Times, 29 November 1921, p.6.

Queensland Times, 14 July 1948, p.2.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 3 October 1865, p.3.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 22 April 1876, p.4.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 9 August 1883, p.4.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 1 October 1904, p.11.

Telegraph (Brisbane), 7 November 1874, p.3.

 


An Old Style Quenching of the Thirst

In earlier times, Ipswich, like most towns and cities across the country, had its share of local soft drink and cordial manufacturers.  One of our first manufacturers was W.G. Livermore.

Born in England on 23 November 1853, William George (W.G) journeyed with his parents George and Mary Ann to Australia on the Kate.  Arriving in Sydney on 18 November 1854, the family stayed in Sydney for six weeks before sailing to Moreton Bay.  In 1855, they travelled to Ipswich on the steamer, Hawke.  William’s father George was known for his cooperage business and involvement with the West Moreton Agricultural and Horticultural Society.

During his time as a local businessman, W.G. Livermore operated at different premises around Ipswich.  In November 1894, he commenced a business in Bremer Street with E. Whiffin called Aerated Waters and Cordial Manufacturers, but by July of the following year the relationship had soured with Mr Edward Whifffin being committed for trial on embezzlement charges.  Ultimately, he was found not guilty of the crime.  Later in the year, Mr Livermore’s business interests were referred to as W.G. Livermore and Co., Aerated Waters and Cordial Makers.

By August 1896, Mr Livermore had acquired the business in Brisbane Street formerly known as John Ferguson’s (cordial manufacturer).   A Queensland Times article dated 20 August noted that William had purchased a vertical “Otto” gas-engine which at the time was the only one of its kind in the country.  The “Otto” was used to drive the aerating machinery.    In this year, the company was known for its manufacture of aerated water, cordials, ginger beer, baking powder, horehound and hop beer as well as soda water crafted from Helidon mineral water.  They were also the sole local agent for Henry Hires’ Root Beer.

During 1897, W.G. Livermore removed his business from the Brisbane Street premises to East Street, next to Mr J. Johnston’s Brewery.  His intention was to continue the manufacture of aerated waters, cordials, vinegar, hop beer and horehound, under the supervision of Mr Ferguson.   That year the company was complimented for its manufacture of kola champagne, a particularly refreshing summer drink that was all the latest “rage”. Despite the name, the flavour of this drink was more likely to have resembled bubble gum or cream soda than either champagne or cola.

On 3 December 1903, two business announements in the Queensland Times highlighted the changes in the drinks industry in Ipswich.  Firstly, Mr Livermore informed his old customers that he had recommenced business as an aerated water manufacturer in the former premises of the West Moreton Brewery in Booval.  He stated that he had no connection with the East Street Factory.   Below this advertisement was one for the Ipswich Aerated Water Co. (proprietors Barnes & Pitman), notifying readers that they were firmly established in the late business of W.E. Thomas which had been carried out in Livermore’s Factory in East Street.  Interestingly, W.E Thomas was the step-son of W.G. Livermore.

 

Demijohn from W G Livermore soft drinks (early 1900s), Ipswich, 1990s - Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Demijohn from W G Livermore soft drinks (early 1900s), Ipswich, 1990s – Image Courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Eagle-eyed readers may have spotted the significance of Mr Livermore’s registered trademark “LAVOOB”.  It is Booval spelt backwards.  Mr Livermore conducted his business in Booval for a number of years, before returning to the centre of town.  He continued with the manufacture of soft drinks and cordials up until the time of his death in March 1923.

Information taken from: ‘Death of Mr G. Livermore’, Queensland Times, Saturday 26 June 1909, p.11;  ‘Death of Mr Livermore’, Queensland Times, Friday 23 March 1923, p.4; ‘London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906”, Ancestry Database, retrieved 11 August 2017; New South Wales, Australia, Assisted Immigrants Passenger Lists, 1826-1896, Ancestry Database, retrieved 11 August 2017;  ‘Advertisement’, Queensland Times, Saturday 1 December 1894, p.1; ‘Ipswich Circuit Court – Criminal Sittings, Queensland Times, Saturday 3 August 1895, p. 3;  ‘A Handy Gas-Engine’, ‘Advertisement’, Queensland Times, Saturday 23 May 1896, p.1; Queensland Times, Thursday 20 August 1896, p,4; ‘Advertisement’, Queensland Times, Saturday 26 June 1897, p.1; ‘Business Announcements’, Queensland Times, Saturday 20 November 1897, p.2; ‘Business Announcements’, Queensland Times, Thursday 03 December 1903, p. 8.

 


Hotel Metropole

Recently the Hotel Metropole on the corner of Waghorn & Brisbane Streets closed its doors. Hotels have stood on this site for over 150 years. Whilst the Metropole first opened in 1906, it was built on the site of the old Harp of Erin Hotel. The hotel was also known as the Silver Fern in earlier years of the 21st century.

 

Hotel Metropole, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Hotel Metropole, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

The Metropole was designed by George Brockwell Gill with public and private bars, dining room, parlour, coffee room, billiard room, shop, kitchen, 1 bedroom and offices on the ground floor. Upstairs there were 13 bedrooms, drawing room, sitting room and 3 bathrooms. A cellar and wash-house were in the basement. The building cost over £3000 including brickwork by John Mackenzie, plumbing & gas-fitting by John Cuthbert and joinery by Arthur Foote, to name a few of the contractors. The structure was up-to-date with indoor lavatories, electric bells, hot water service and gas lights. And there were many decorative architectural details incorporated, including a stained glass window.

Mr C. Roberts, employed earlier by T.W.Boody, intended to use the shop on the ground floor as a hair-dressing salon and tobacconist.

Hotel  Metropole, front entrance, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Hotel Metropole, front entrance, 253 Brisbane Street, Ipswich, 1991 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

In October 1906 when it opened, the hotel provided accommodation for “man and beast” (there were stables) and alcoholic beverages for thirsty travellers and locals. Miss Fairley was the licensee. Various members of her family were licensees of the Harp of Erin Hotel from 1893 until its closure.

Whilst the Metropole is an attractive and substantial brick building the Harp of Erin was a wooden structure that was removed or demolished in late 1905 or early 1906 to make way for the new hotel. It had become somewhat run-down by the 1890s but survived in some form until the early 20th century. Despite its perhaps lack of grandeur the Harp of Erin was clearly a landmark in the town as early as 1861 when Bee-Hive Stores used its name and location to advertise their own clothing & groceries business situated opposite in Brisbane Street. John Moran was the licensee from 1861-1862.

During the 19th century, victualler’s licenses had to be applied for and renewed annually. This involved advertising your intentions to apply, renew or transfer in the local paper and attending the Licensing Court.  An applicant had to have a good reputation in order to be successful in procuring a publican’s license for the sale of “fermented and spirituous liquors”.  The Justices in the court and local police could be formidable in their opposition to applications. Licenses were often transferred and the Harp of Erin had several licensees between 1861 and 1900, including Robert McGrory from 1872-1887 and Gaius Frederick Brown from 1890-1893. It appears that holding a liquor license at this time in Ipswich was not always a licence to print money. In 1876 there were 23 hotels in town or about 1 pub for every 108 adults.

The Metropole also experienced its fair share of burglaries and fires. In 1925, 1932 and 1940 the hotel was damaged by fire. The latter fire caused significant damage estimated at £2000 which was a considerable sum in 1940.  The earlier fires were chimney fires. Ironically, it seems that in December 1932 more damage was caused by water from the hose put up the chimney to douse the fire, than was caused by flames and smoke.

Panoramic view from railway line behind Brisbane Street, Ipswich, ca. 1987 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Panoramic view from railway line behind Brisbane Street, Ipswich, ca. 1987 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

 

Information taken from:

Picture Ipswich

http://picture.ipswich.qld.gov.au/awweb/main.jsp

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 29 September 1906, p.14.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 5 November 1861, p.2.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 22 April 1876, p.4.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 27 July 1865, p.1.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 4 October 1906, p.11.

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser, 10 December 1895, p.3.

Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld), 20 March 1894, p.5.


Ipswich North State School 150th Anniversary

Ipswich North State School 1970. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Ipswich North State School 1970. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Ipswich North State School celebrated its 150th anniversary on Saturday 8 July 2017.

Ipswich North State School was formally opened on 1 July 1867. An account of the opening was originally reported by the Queensland Times on 2 July 1867. This same article states: “Only twenty-six children were entered on the roll, but now that the school is known to be opened, this number will no doubt soon be considerably increased.”

Classes for boys and girls were in the one building with a partition dividing them until 1874 when tenders were called to build a Boys’ School. The original building was then used for the Girls’ and Infants’ school. In the early 1930s both buildings needed major repairs so the decision was made to rebuild in brick and combine both the boys and girls into one large building. This building was opened on 4 May 1935, then in 1937 four extra classrooms and an undercover play area were added. This brick building is what we see today.

J. J. C. Bradfield. Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

One of the speakers at the opening on Saturday 4 May 1935 was J. J. C. Bradfield who attended the Infants’ School then continued at the Boys’ School until he won a scholarship to Ipswich Grammar School. His name appears in a list which was published in the Brisbane Courier on Wednesday 2 February 1881.

Grammar School Scholarships. Brisbane Courier Wed 2 Feb 1881. Image taken from Trove Digitised Newspapers

Grammar School Scholarships. Brisbane Courier Wed 2 Feb 1881. Image taken from Trove Digitised Newspapers

Bradfield’s achievements include the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Story Bridge in Brisbane.

Information taken from:

Queensland Times, Tuesday 2 July, 1867, p.3 Local and General News

Brisbane Courier, Wednesday 2 February, 1881, p.3 Grammar School Scholarships

Personal correspondence


School holidays in Ipswich

School holidays are always cause for celebration when you are a child – no school and long days to fill with play and friends! Pure bliss!

When I was young in the early 1960s, school holidays in Ipswich were a treat. There was a visit to the Wintergarden Theatre or The Ritz (before it was demolished in 1966) to see the latest picture on offer.

Boys posing to advertise the film 'The Light in the forest' playing at the Ritz Theatre, Ipswich, December, 1961 -Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Boys posing to advertise the film ‘The Light in the forest’ playing at the Ritz Theatre, Ipswich, December, 1961 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Going to the pictures always involved a stopover at the lolly counter to pick up something sweet to chew during the movie, like Minties or Jersey milk toffee.  (In fact this was probably more important than the movie itself.)

Candy Bar of Wintergarden Theatre, Ipswich, 1979 -  Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Candy Bar of Wintergarden Theatre, Ipswich, 1979 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

On other days there would be a trip to Queens Park to play on the swings or slippery slide, and admire the kangaroos and koalas in the animal enclosure. These outings were highly anticipated and sometimes included a picnic lunch in the park.

Children on bullock wagon in Queens Park, Ipswich, 1966 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Children on bullock wagon in Queens Park, Ipswich, 1966 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

On shopping days, we would put on our “good” clothes and “go to town” enjoying the window displays, pretty clothes and toys for sale at Woolworths and Cribb & Foote. We never had any money to spend but since it was school holidays and treat-time we might have an ice cream soda at Penny’s in Brisbane Street.

Brisbane Street, from the corner of Ellenborough Street, Ipswich, 1960 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Brisbane Street, from the corner of Ellenborough Street, Ipswich, 1960 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Another outing was a day spent at Colleges Crossing or playing by the Bremer.

Colleges Crossing, Ipswich, 1961 - Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

Colleges Crossing, Ipswich, 1961 – Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich

In the 1960s it didn’t get better than this for kids enjoying a break from the routine of school.

Great memories of great times in Ipswich in the ‘60s.


Our People, Our Past

Portrait of Mr William Bretherton Parkinson, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Portrait of Mr William Bretherton Parkinson, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Born in England in 1886, Mr William Bretherton Parkinson came to Australia when he was 19 years of age. He worked for some time at the Ipswich Gas Company and Cribb and Foote’s. In 1919 he established himself as a Real Estate Agent and became very successful, partnering up with Mr Vic Noble in 1948. Messrs Parkinson and Noble were situated in Brisbane Street. He married Eileen Massey Robinson in 1915 and had two daughters. In 1942 his eldest daughter, Mavis Parkinson a missionary was killed during the invasion of New Guinea. Mr W B Parkinson passed away at the age of 65 years in 1951. (Information taken from The Queensland Times 17 May, 1951)

Portrait of the Hon. Jos. Francis, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Portrait of the Hon. Jos. Francis, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Sir Josiah Francis was born in Ipswich in 1890 and completed his schooling at St Edmunds College, Ipswich. In 1908 he began working as a clerk in the Queensland Department of Justice. He served as second lieutenant with the 15th Battalion in WWI and was wounded in 1918. Returning to Ipswich after the War, Francis involved himself in the Ipswich sub-branch and the Moreton district of the Returned Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Imperial League of Australia. He was elected into the House of Representatives in 1922 as a Nationalist candidate for Moreton and continued his political career concerning himself in matters relating to ex-servicemen. In 1927 he married Edna Clarke-Cribb. He became minister for the army from 1949 to 1955 and the navy from 1949-51 and 1954-55. In 1956 Francis was appointed Australian consul-general in New York and was knighted in 1957, retiring to Brisbane in 1961. He passed away in 1964 at Toowong. (Information taken from Australian Dictionary of Biography website 07.02.2017)

Portrait of Frederick James Meacham, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Portrait of Frederick James Meacham, Ipswich, n.d. (Image courtesy of Picture Ipswich)

Born in England in 1892, Frederick James Meacham attended King Edward VI Grammar School. He and his family came to Australia in 1913 on the ship Omrah and settled in Maryborough. In 1916, aged 23 years, Frederick enlisted into the Australian Imperial Force. Returning from War Frederick moved to Auchenflower where he married Phoebe (Jean) Ada Elizabeth Cowton in April, 1921. They had two sons and two daughters. The family moved to Ipswich where Frederick was employed with The Queensland Times for over 20 years as a journalist, becoming Editor in 1923 and Manager for 13 years. Meacham was Director of the Queensland Country Press Pty Ltd, President of the Queensland Country Press Association, Chairman of Directors of the Ipswich Broadcasting Co. Pty Ltd, President of the Press Institute and Chairman of Directors of The Queensland Times. F J Meacham was also President of the Ipswich Rotary Club. He left The Queensland Times in 1941 to take up the position of Secretary of the Australian Provincial Daily Press Ltd in Victoria and by 1942 added Director to his role. In 1955 he was awarded an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire – Civil Division). Mr Meacham passed away in 1968 aged 77. The ‘F J Meacham Award’ “is presented annually to the regional daily newspaper judged to have attained the highest technical and editorial standard and having best served its community.”(Information taken from Ancestry Library Edition; Ancestry – Who’s Who in Australian 1921 -1950; The Queensland Times 4 May 1921; The Queensland Times, 13 Dec, 1941 ‘Mr F J Meacham Honoured’; The Argus 1 Jan 1955; The Canberra Times 15 Oct 1968; The Canberra Times 17 May 1985)